Jane Eyre, the portrayal of women

Amos Johnson
By Amos Johnson October 6, 2017 12:50

Jane Eyre, the portrayal of women

Lauren Fields (Jane), left, Alicia Plummer (Jane’s inner self), centre, Cole Reid (Rochester), right, at the Essex Hall Theatre (Photo By Doug MacLellan).

Lauren Fields (Jane), left, Alicia Plummer (Jane’s inner self), centre, Cole Reid (Rochester), right, at the Essex Hall Theatre (Photo By Doug MacLellan).

By Amos Johnson

Charlotte Brontë’s gothic romance novel, Jane Eyre, was performed by the University Players from Sept. 22 – Oct. 1 at the Essex Hall Theatre.

Jane Eyre is a gothic romance story which explores the natural passion and desires of women. The story is about Jane, an orphaned girl who is limited to working as a governess in Thornfield Hall, where she meets the master of Thornfield, Mr. Rochester.

“She (Jane) is fighting against social norms and fighting against her own feelings, internal battles and having the strength to go for what she wants,” said Eva Flores, 20, who plays the characters Mrs. Fairfax and Mrs. Reed.

Polly Teale’s adaptation explores the twisted love between Jane and Mr. Rochester, as well as the two sides of Jane. There is her “normal” side, wanting to be accepted and then there is her “passion-driven” side, portraying her inner self, which she hides in order to be accepted.

Haolun Xu, 23, is studying communication, media and film at the University of Windsor and enjoyed the show.

“The lights, the songs and the special effects are incorporated well…the actors can perform so heartily,” said Xu.

The show is two hours long and stays true to the source material in terms of text, according to the actors.

Xanath Fuentes Natanson, 21, who plays Abigail, Helen, Adele and Mary Rivers, explained what it is like playing multiple characters.

“You have these clear differentiations between your characters, part of the beauty is also finding similarities between (them),” said Natanson.

The novel was originally published in 1847. Although it faced controversy for its portrayal of society’s treatment of women, it did not stop it from becoming a hit.

Amos Johnson
By Amos Johnson October 6, 2017 12:50

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